Sunday, August 29, 2004

Coming soon to a pay cheque near you.

This spring Kofi Annan was busy trying to float the idea of the UN controlling and regulating the internet. So I suppose it should come as no surprise since Saddam is no longer financing the coffers of UN supporters that UN bureaucrats are now trying to institute the idea of global business and consumer taxes to finance UN activities.

The Center for Individual Freedom reports:

Like a bad sequel to a rotten horror movie, the debate over global taxation once again is rearing its ugly head — courtesy of the United Nations. And, despite lacking the requisite hockey mask and chain saw, the seemingly countless proposals for the imposition of global taxes are truly terrifying.

In July, Inter Presse news service reported that a top U.N. official was preparing a new study that will outline numerous global tax proposals to be considered by the General Assembly at its September meeting. The proposals will likely include everything from global taxes on e-mails and Internet use to a global gas tax and levies on airline travel. If adopted, American taxpayers could wind up paying hundreds of billions of dollars each year to the United Nations.

U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan is among those leading the charge, having stated that he "strongly supports finding new sources of funding" for the U.N. through global taxes, according to Inter Presse. In fact, Annan made very clear his support for the imposition of global taxes in a 2001 Technical Note that he authored for a U.N. conference. "The need to finance the provision of global public goods in an increasingly globalized world also adds new urgency to the need for innovative new sources of financing," Annan wrote. The Note goes on to describe and evaluate the merits of several global tax proposals.

What are the odds that the Canadian Liberal government will not support any UN initiatives?

Tip: No Illusions

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